Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Summary of the draft iwi statistical standard

This summary highlights information about the iwi statistical standard that's of value to the general public.

See Iwi statistical standard for more detailed and technical information.

Purpose of the iwi statistical standard

As a Treaty of Waitangi partner, Stats NZ plays an important role in making sure meaningful information about and for Māori is available. The iwi statistical standard provides guidelines for how to collect, organise, and report iwi and iwi-related groups’ information and statistics.

Iwi and Māori want information on iwi and iwi-related groups to support the well-being and development of their people. Government wants this information to assist with planning, delivering, and monitoring services for iwi and Māori.

Following the standard’s guidelines ensures that information on iwi and iwi-related groups is valuable and useful to iwi, Māori, and government.

Focus

The focus of the standard is whakapapa-based kinship groupings.

Descriptions of iwi

Groups included in the iwi classification (list) must fit the description (concept and definition) of iwi used in this standard.

Concept

An iwi, or Māori tribe, is one of the largest kinship groupings and is generally made up of several hapū that are all descended from a common ancestor. Hapū are clusters of whānau where the whānau is usually an extended family grouping consisting of children, parents, often grandparents, and other closely related kin.

Definition

For statistical purposes, an iwi is defined as a whakapapa-based kinship grouping that generally has several hapū and one or more active marae, and a recognised structure that represents the interests of the iwi, such as a rōpū whakahaere, committee, or board.

Iwi classification (list)

The iwi classification (list) is made up of iwi and iwi-related groups.

Groups listed as an iwi, in recognised iwi lists such as Te Kāhui Māngai, Tūhono, and the Māori Fisheries Act 2004, will be included in the iwi classification. In the future, iwi listed in other national and local government agencies' iwi lists may also be included. These iwi lists will need to be whakapapa-based kinship groupings, and will have undergone an appropriate process for determining which groups to include.

Kinship groups that are not in recognised iwi lists are encouraged to provide information for the group to consider them for inclusion. This includes information about whether a group has:

  • a shared Māori descent line and its own traditions 
  • one or more active marae – these do not need to be physical buildings 
  • a recognised structure that represents the interests of the iwi, such as a rōpū whakahaere, committee, or board.

Together with other government agencies, and in partnership with Māori, Stats NZ will consider the information a group provides for inclusion.

Contact classifications@stats.govt.nz if your group is missing from the iwi classification. These groups will be invited to complete a form, which asks for information based on the conditions for inclusion.

Collecting information on iwi

To collect valuable and useful information from a question on iwi, the standard recommends it:

  • asks for the name and location of a person’s iwi, which helps place the iwi in the right category 
  • asks the person themselves which iwi(s) they belong to, unless they are a child or cannot answer for reasons such as death, injury, or sickness 
  • makes sure a form has space to record at least three iwi 
  • does not mean also asking for Māori descent.

Sharing information from an iwi question

There are two ways to share information collected from an iwi question:

  1. reporting the number of people in each iwi and iwi-related group in the classification 
  2. reporting the counts of written responses to the iwi question.

Both reports can include more information if the counts do not cause a privacy or confidentiality concern by allowing a person to be identified. This extra information could include age, sex, occupation, or areas where people live.

Glossary

hapū
Clusters of whānau (families) where the whānau is usually an extended family grouping consisting of children, parents, often grandparents, and other closely related kin.

iwi-related groups
Kinship groups with a Māori descent line, such as a waka grouping or confederation.

marae
A traditional meeting place for whānau, hapū, and iwi members (Abridged from: Te Kāhui Māngai).

non-kinship Māori grouping
Non-kinship groups connect people of Māori descent, but are not bound by ancestral lineage. Non-kinship groups are typically locality-based.

whakapapa
Genealogy, genealogical table, lineage, descent. Reciting whakapapa was, and is, an important skill and reflects the importance of genealogies in Māori society – for leadership, land and fishing rights, kinship, and status. It is central to all Māori institutions (Abridged from: Māori dictionary).

whānau
A family or extended family (Source: Te Kāhui Māngai).

References

Moorfield, J (nd). Māori dictionary. Retrieved from http://Māoridictionary.co.nz.

Te Puni Kōkiri (nd). Te Kāhui Māngai: Directory of iwi and Māori organisations. Retrieved from www.tkm.govt.nz.

Published 6 April 2017

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+