Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Classification and coding process

Classification criteria

The categories are distinguished by inclusion or exclusion from the labour force and if a person works or not.

Classification

Labour force status is derived from the following classifications:

  • age
  • job indicator 1, 2 and 3
  • found work
  • seeking work
  • job search methods
  • available for work

Labour force status is a flat classification with 3 categories – excluding residual categories. Job indicator 1, 2 and 3, found work, seeking work and available for work are all flat classifications with 2 categories – excluding residual categories. The job search classification is a flat classification of nine categories – excluding residual categories. Age is a flat classification with single–year categories from 0 years to 119 years inclusive, plus a category for 120 years and over. The full age classification is available in Age – download of classification.

The residual categories are defined in Glossary and references.

The full classification is available in the 'Available Files' section on the main page.

Coding process

The process for deriving the labour force status from the component variables listed in the above classification is detailed in the following link: Flow chart.

Job search methods determines whether a person is actively searching for work or not. Looking at job advertisements in the newspaper or on the Internet is not considered to be actively seeking work. Actively seeking work is applying for a job whether by letter, telephone, Internet or in person; contacting a private employment agency; contacting Work and Income New Zealand about a job; placing an advertisement to find a job; contacting friends or relatives about a job; taking steps to set up your own business or contacting a careers advisor or vocational guidance officer and all other types of job search methods.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+