Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Framework for Cultural Statistics
Definition

Gathering statistics on any subject requires definition of the subject area. The question 'What is culture?' has been extensively debated for many years with no single concept or definition providing a universally accepted answer. Commonly used concepts describe culture as the way in which people affirm identity and achieve a sense of belonging. This is manifest in the sharing of common objects (such as items of dress or decoration), common behaviours (such as language, music or dance) and common knowledge (such as systems of belief and interpretations of the past).

Cultural statistics attempt to measure the means by which commonality is communicated: for example, in the design of items, the performance of music, the telling of a story, the expression of beliefs, or the teaching of the past. Cultural statistics, therefore, measure the activities through which culture is communicated from person to person and from generation to generation.

While some cultural activities help to differentiate New Zealanders from the rest of the world (producing a sense of identity and nationhood), others help to identify various groups of people within New Zealand who share common cultural interests and aspirations, such as youth and religious groups. New Zealand's cultural statistics must reflect the full range of cultural activities undertaken in this country. This means acknowledging, in particular, the unique contribution of Māori, and also the many different ethnic communities and other groups giving New Zealand society its distinctive cultural mix.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+