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Overall relationship

Overview

An overall relationship exists between dwellings, households and families in terms of how data is collected and derived.

Statistics New Zealand's household and family statistics use a physical dwelling (street address) as the basis for census enumeration. There must be someone present in the dwelling on census night for the dwelling to be enumerated as 'occupied', and 'private' or 'non-private'. Whoever completes the census dwelling form acts as the reference person, and is required to list all the people who usually live in that dwelling. Responses about the relationship between that reference person and other people in the dwelling are used to help derive household and family statistics. These statistics also include information given about absentees (people who usually live in that dwelling but are absent on census night, either temporarily elsewhere in New Zealand or overseas). However, only limited information is obtainable about those absent households and families.

 

Flow chart, overall relationship.

1. Unoccupied dwellings

  • If a dwelling is unoccupied on census night (that is, the enumerator has attempted to make contact three times but has been unsuccessful), the enumerator records that the dwelling is unoccupied, and whether this is because the residents are away, or because the dwelling is empty (for example, for sale or being renovated).
  • The terms 'residents away' and 'empty dwelling' are defined in the Glossary and References section.
  • An unoccupied dwelling is not classified as 'private','non-private', 'temporary' or 'permanent'.
  • Dwellings under construction are noted and recorded.

2. Household composition

  • Each private occupied dwelling is classified by its household composition, according to the relationships between the people who usually reside together (for example, "Couple only and other person(s), some or all related").

3. Family type

  • Family statistics are a subset of household statistics, and comprise family nuclei made up of couples, parents and children who usually reside together (for example, "One parent with children").

 

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