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Glossary and references

Glossary

Dwelling

A structure, part of a structure, or group of structures that is used, or intended to be used as a place where people reside. A dwelling may be permanent or temporary and may function as private or non-private.

Dwellings under construction

All houses, flats, groups or blocks of flats being built.

Empty dwelling

Where a dwelling clearly has no current occupants and new occupants are not expected to move in, on or before the reference date. Unoccupied dwellings being repaired or renovated are defined as empty dwellings. Unoccupied baches or holiday homes are also defined as empty dwellings.

Family (family nucleus)

In census statistics, a couple, with or without children, or one parent and their children, usually living together in a household. The children do not have partners or children of their own living in the same household. Related people, such as siblings, who are not in a couple or parent-child relationship, are therefore excluded from this definition.

Family type

Family nuclei classified according to the presence or absence of couples, parents and children.

Household

In census statistics, one person who usually resides alone, or two or more people who usually reside together and share facilities (such as eating facilities, cooking facilities, bathroom and toilet facilities, and a living area), in a private dwelling.

Non-private dwelling

A dwelling providing short- or long-term communal or transitory type accommodation. Non-private dwellings are generally available to the public by virtue of employment, study, special need, legal requirement or recreation.

Occupied dwelling

In census statistics, a dwelling is defined as occupied if it is:

  • occupied at midnight on the night of the data collection, or
  • occupied at any time during the twelve hours following midnight on the night of the data collection unless the occupant(s) completed a questionnaire at another dwelling during this period.

For all other data collections, a dwelling is defined as occupied if it is occupied during a sufficient part of the reference period.

Permanent private dwelling

Any private occupied dwelling that is both fixed in location and of durable or permanent construction.

Private dwelling

A dwelling accommodating a person or a group of people and generally unavailable for public use. The main purpose of a private dwelling is as a place of habitation for residents who usually live independently within the community.

Resident

A person who usually lives in an area. This is a statistical, not a legal, definition generally based on a person's self-identified usual address.

In census statistics, a resident is a person who self-identifies on the census individual form that they usually live in an area. People overseas at census date do not complete a census form.

In external migration statistics, a resident is a person who self-identifies:

  1. on the departure card that they have lived in New Zealand for 12 months or more
  2. on the arrival card that they live in New Zealand and have been away from New Zealand for less than 12 months
  3. on the arrival card that they intend to stay in New Zealand for 12 months or more.

The term 'resident' may be used differently in other contexts such as economic statistics.

Refer also to Resident temporarily overseas and Usual residence.

Residents away

In census statistics, residents away indicates that occupants of a dwelling are known to be temporarily away and are not expected to return by noon on the day after the data collection.

Resident temporarily overseas

A person who usually lives in New Zealand but who is overseas for a period of less than 12 months.

In census statistics, a resident temporarily overseas is a person who is identified on the census dwelling form as usually living in that dwelling but who is overseas for a period of less than 12 months.

In external migration statistics, a resident temporarily overseas is a person who self-identifies on the arrival card that they live in New Zealand and have been away from New Zealand for less than 12 months.

Temporary private dwelling

Caravans, cabins, tents and other makeshift dwellings that are the usual residence of households.

Unoccupied dwelling

In census statistics, a dwelling is defined as unoccupied if it is:

  • unoccupied at all times during the twelve hours following midnight on the night of the data collection, and
  • suitable for habitation.

For all other data collections, a dwelling is defined as unoccupied if it is not defined as occupied or under construction.

Usual residence

This is a statistical, not a legal, definition generally based on a person's self-identified usual address. The Statistical Standard for Usual Residence (1999) states that usual residence is the address of the dwelling where a person self-identifies that they usually live, except in the specific cases listed below:

  1. People who board at another residence to attend primary or secondary school, and return to their parent’s(s’) or guardian’s(s’) home for the holidays, usually reside at the address of their parent(s) or guardian(s). Post-secondary students usually reside at the address where they live while studying.
  2. Children in joint custody usually reside at the place where they spend more nights, or if they spend equal amounts of time at each residence, they usually reside at the place where they are at the time of the survey.
  3. People who are in rest homes, hospitals, prisons or other institutions, usually reside where they consider themselves to live, and this may include the institution.
  4. A person whose home is on any ship, boat or vessel permanently located in any harbour shall be deemed to usually reside at the wharf or landing place (or main wharf or landing place) of the harbour.
  5. A person from another country who has lived, or intends to live, in New Zealand for 12 months or more usually resides at his or her address in New Zealand (as in external migration).
  6. People of no fixed abode have no usual residence.
  7. People who spend equal amounts of time residing at different addresses, and can not decide which address is their usual residence, usually reside at the address they were surveyed at.
  8. If none of the above guidelines apply, the person usually resides at the address he or she was surveyed at.

Visitor

A person who usually lives elsewhere. This is a statistical, not a legal, definition generally based on a person's self-identified usual address.

References

The following statistical standards are available on the Statistics New Zealand website:

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