Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Glossary and references

Glossary

Adult child

An adult child is a 'child in a family nucleus' who is employed full time or who is aged 18 years or over. (This group is made up of all dependent young persons and all non-dependent children.)

Child(ren) in a family nucleus

To be a ‘child in a family nucleus’, a person must have usual residence with at least one parent, and have no partner or child(ren) of their own living in the same household. Note that ‘child(ren) in a family nucleus’ can be any age.

For the purposes of the standard classifications of child dependency, ‘child(ren) in a family nucleus’ can be divided into four groups: dependent child(ren), dependent young persons, non-dependent children, and children of unknown dependency status.

Dependent child(ren) and young person(s)

A child (birth, biological, adopted, step- or other) in a family nucleus who is aged under 15 years, or who is aged 15–24 years of age and not employed full time.

Dependent child(ren) under 18

A child (birth/biological, adopted, step- or other) in a family nucleus who is aged under 15 years, or who is aged 15–17 and not employed full time.

Dependent young person

A child (birth/biological, adopted, step- or other) in a family nucleus who is aged 18–24 years and is not employed full time.

Employed full-time

People who are employed full time usually work thirty or more hours per week.

Non-dependent child(ren)

A child (birth/biological, adopted, step- or other) in a family nucleus who is either aged 15–24 years and employed full time, or is aged 25 years or older.

Parent

The mother, father (birth/biological, adopted, or step-), or ‘person in a parent role’ of a ‘child in a family nucleus’. A ‘person in a parent role’ is a person who is not a mother or father (birth/biological, adopted or step-) of the child, but who nevertheless usually resides with that child. The child does not have a partner or child of their own and does not usually reside with their mother or father (birth/biological, adopted or step-). A person in a parent role can be considered a parent according to current social norms regarding parenting. The specific criteria as to who is included or excluded from being a ‘person in a parent role’ should be defined by the survey.

Usual residence

Usual residence is the address of the dwelling where a person considers himself or herself to usually reside, except in the specific cases listed in the guidelines. See the standard for usual residence.

References

Statistics NZ (1999). Child Dependency Status Classification.Statistics NZ, Wellington.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+