Stats NZ has a new website.

For new releases go to

www.stats.govt.nz

As we transition to our new site, you'll still find some Stats NZ information here on this archive site.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
The pursuit of well-being

This chapter explains the importance of measuring Māori well-being, and why we used self-reported life satisfaction to measure it.

The policy interest in Māori well-being

Significant policy initiatives are aimed at enhancing the well-being of Maori. A number of these recognise the relationship between outcomes in multiple aspects of an individual’s life, the role of whānau on individual’s outcomes, and well-being models grounded in a Māori world view.

The most significant of these initiatives is Whānau Ora (Te Puni Kokiri, nd), an inter-agency approach providing inclusive health and social services to New Zealand whānau and families in need. The goal of Whānau Ora is to empower whānau to significantly improve the health, educational, and economic outcomes using the money invested by government agencies in social services.

Understanding the combinations of factors that affect Māori perceptions of well-being, and variations in the distribution of these factors across population groups, can help develop and implement policies aimed at enhancing Māori social and economic well-being.

Life satisfaction as a measure of well-being

In modern societies, we gauge progress by using economic indicators like gross domestic product and per capita income. However, evidence shows that self-reported life satisfaction is a credible approach to measuring people’s subjective well-being, which is an important aspect of overall well-being.

Life satisfaction is a subjective open measure of well-being. It is subjective because we simply ask people whether they are satisfied with their life as a whole. It is open because we do not pre-define the components of well-being – it is up to each individual to judge whether they are satisfied or not.

Life satisfaction measures reflect the notion that people themselves are the best judges of the quality of their lives. Note that well-being might encompass a wider range of concepts than just life satisfaction, which is but one emotion that encompasses an individual’s wider well-being.

Life satisfaction in Te Kupenga

In 2013, we carried out Te Kupenga, the first survey of Māori well-being. Te Kupenga collected information on a wide range of topics to give an overall picture of the social, cultural, and economic well-being of Māori in New Zealand.

See Te Kupenga for further information.

In Te Kupenga, we asked respondents one question on how they felt about their life as a whole (at the time of the interview). They answered on a scale of 0 to 10 – where 0 means ‘completely dissatisfied’ and 10 is ‘completely satisfied‘. This is the measure we used as the dependent variable in our analysis to determine what factors are associated with Māori well-being.

  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+
Top
  • Share this page to Facebook
  • Share this page to Twitter
  • Share this page to Google+