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Who lives in Auckland?

Auckland has a younger and more ethnically diverse population

Population estimates show that Auckland has a younger population than the rest of New Zealand. The region has a higher proportion of people aged under 45, and a lower proportion of people in the middle and older age groups.

At 30 June 2015, the median age (half are younger and half older than this age) was 34.4 years for people in Auckland, and 39.2 for the rest of New Zealand.

Figure 1
Graph showing age distribution in the Auckland region and rest of New Zealand, for the estimated resident population at 30 June 2015.

Data from the 2013 Census showed that Auckland has a different ethnic composition compared with the rest of the country. The region has a greater proportion of Asian and Pacific peoples and a lower proportion of European and Māori. Only 59.3 percent of Aucklanders identified as European, compared with 81.3 percent for the rest of New Zealand. In the Auckland population, 23.1 percent identified as Asian and 14.6 percent as Pacific peoples. This compared with 6.1 percent and 3.8 percent, respectively, for the rest of New Zealand.

Figure 2

Graph showing the proportion of major ethnic grous in the Auckland region and rest of New Zealand at the 2013 Census.


One-quarter of people of Māori descent and one-quarter of people identifying with Māori ethnicity live in Auckland. Māori descent refers to biological ancestry while ethnicity is self-identified (ie the ethnic group or groups that people identify with or feel they belong to), so populations overlap. Of the 164,000 people of Māori descent in Auckland, 123,000 stated one or more iwi in the 2013 Census. (This excludes responses not identified as a specific iwi. For further information see the Statistical standard for iwi).

Table 1

Top 5 iwi affiliations in the Auckland region
2013
Iwi Number of people(1)
Ngāpuhi 50,580
Ngāti Porou 13,158
Waikato 13,011
Ngāti Maniapoto 8,346
Ngāti Whātua 7,353
1. Count of people of Māori descent who stated one or more iwi on their census form.
Source: Statistics New Zealand

 

Te reo Māori is the second most-commonly spoken language nationally (after English), but is only the fifth in the Auckland region. This reflects the ethnic diversity of the region as Samoan, Hindi, and Northern Chinese are more commonly spoken than te reo.

Table 2

 Top 5 languages most commonly spoken – Auckland region and New Zealand 2013
 Language  Total Auckland region  Total New Zealand
 Number of people(1)  Number of people(1)
 English  1,233,633  3,819,969
 Māori  30,924  148,395
 Samoan  58,197  86,403
 Hindi  49,521  66,309
 Northern Chinese  38,781  52,263
 1. Count of people of who stated one or more languages spoken on their census form.
Source: Statistics New Zealand

More than half a million Aucklanders were born overseas

The 2013 Census showed that Asia was the most common birthplace for Aucklanders born overseas, with 13 percent from the People’s Republic of China and 8 percent from India. After Asia, the most common overseas birthplaces are the Pacific Islands, the United Kingdom, and Ireland.

Nearly half (46 percent) of New Zealand’s net gain of international migrants was in the Auckland region in the June 2015 year. Half of all migrants who stated an address on their arrival card were moving to the Auckland region. Of those who stated an address on their departure card, 42 percent were migrating from the Auckland region.

International travel and migration estimates show that in the same period the largest sources of migrants arriving in Auckland were Australia (7,100 people), India (6,400), China (5,800), and the United Kingdom (4,700).

In the June 2015 year, 65 percent of migrants that arrived in Auckland were aged between 15 and 34 – contributing to the younger age distribution in Auckland. It is not unusual for a large proportion of migrants to be within this age group, but Auckland’s proportion is higher than in other regions.

Figure 3
Graph showing net permanent and long-term migration in the Auckland region for the year ended June 1991 to 2015.


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