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Health and well-being

Aucklanders have the same level of life satisfaction as other New Zealanders

Data from the NZGSS 2014 showed that 83 percent of Aucklanders aged 15 years and over rated their overall life satisfaction as 7 or above (on a zero to 10 scale). This is the same proportion as for the rest of New Zealand.

The proportion of Aucklanders who believe they have excellent or very good health was 65 percent, while only 12 percent said they have fair/poor health. In comparison, 59 percent of other New Zealanders believe they have excellent or very good health, while 14 percent said they have fair/poor health. This difference may be associated with Auckland’s younger population, as older age groups are more likely to experience poorer health.

The proportion of Aucklanders who said they feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark was 60 percent. This is a slightly lower proportion compared with people living in other New Zealand regions with large cities – 63 percent of people in Wellington and 62 percent of people in Canterbury feel safe walking alone in their neighbourhood after dark.

When asked if they feel safe at home alone at night, 87 percent of Aucklanders said they feel safe, which is comparable with Canterbury at 88 percent and Wellington at 87 percent. Half of Aucklanders feel safe when using or waiting for public transport at night, compared with 60 and 49 percent of people in the Wellington and Canterbury regions, respectively.

Disability rates lower in Auckland

The 2013 Disability Survey found that the Auckland household disability rate (19 percent) was significantly lower than the national household rate of 23 percent. Note that these proportions include only adults and children living in households, and not disabled adults in residential care facilities.

The lower disability rate in Auckland can be partly explained by the region’s younger age structure, as disability rates increase with age.

The higher proportion of Asian and Pacific peoples living in Auckland may also contribute to Auckland’s lower disability rate. Overall, Asian and Pacific peoples have lower disability rates compared with other ethnicities. (Pacific peoples have a younger age profile, which means their age-adjusted disability rate is relatively higher. For more information see Disability Survey: 2013.)

Aucklanders have less contact with family

The 2014 NZGSS showed that more than half (56 percent) of Aucklanders had weekly contact with family living in another household compared with 68 percent of other New Zealanders. This may be related to the higher proportions of migrants and students in Auckland.

Aucklanders had a similar level of contact with friends – 68 percent had weekly contact, compared with 67 percent for the rest of New Zealand.

The proportion of Aucklanders who said they did not feel lonely in the last four weeks was 65 percent. In comparison, 63 percent of other New Zealanders said they did not feel lonely.

Figure 13
Graph showing social connections in the Auckland region and rest of New Zealand, for the period April 2014 to March 2015.

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