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2013 Census iwi grouping profiles:
Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau

2018 Census place summaries has the latest information

Mihi

Tīhei mauri ora!

Ki ngā uri o ngā maunga whakahī, ngā uri whakatipu o ngā moana me ngā awa tapu o te motu huri āwhio i ngā tōpito o te ao tūroa, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa.

Tēnā hoki koutou i ngā hunga kua riro ki te pō, kua riro ki te kāpunipunitanga o te wairua.
Kua mihia, kua tangihia rātou, nō reira ko te whakatau noa ake, ko rātou ki a rātou, ko tātou ki a tātou. Nō reira, tēnā tātou katoa.

Ko ngā kōrero me ngā papatau e whai ake nei i ahu mai te Tatauranga 2013 o ngā tāngata huri noa i Aotearoa me o rātou whare noho. Ko te tatauranga te matamata o ngā pārongo e pā ana ki te iwi Māori e kite ai tātou i ngā rerekētanga i roto i te whitu tau kua hipa, e mōhio ai tātou ki ngā tīkanga ahu whakamua i ngā tau e haere ake nei.

Ka nui rawa āku mihi ki te iwi Māori, nā koutou tonu ēnei kōrero i homaihia i runga i te whakaaro ka whai hua ai koutou i ēnei mahi. Koia tēnei ko te tikanga o tēnei whakaritenga ā-iwi, he whakahoki kōrero ki ngā iwi Māori o Aotearoa. Kei reira anō ētahi atu kōrero mai i te tatauranga me ngā hua, ratonga hoki e pā ana ki te iwi Māori e kitea ai ki tō mātou paetukutuku, www.stats.govt.nz/Census hei āwhina i a koutou i roto i a koutou mahi rangahau, whakamahere kaupapa, whakatakotoranga whakaaro hoki.

The Census of Population and Dwellings has been an important source of information for Māori for more than a century. The 1991 Census was the first time since 1901 that a question on iwi affiliation was included. The iwi affiliation question has been included in each subsequent census, in recognition of the importance of including this traditional Māori institution in official statistics.

This profile is one of a set of iwi profiles based on data from the 2013 Census. The profile presents a wide range of information on the social and economic well-being of the iwi grouping, which will allow you to measure the development of your iwi grouping and assist in future decision making and planning. The topics covered include: population, age and sex, te reo, education, labour force, unpaid activities, income, smoking, religion, number of children born, households and families, housing, and motor vehicles and telecommunications.

Statistics New Zealand gratefully acknowledges the contribution of Māori to the 2013 Census. It is through your participation that we have been able to produce these profiles.

Heoiti, kāti ake au i konei i runga i ngā whakaaro pai ki a koutou, tēnā koutou katoa.

Nāku iti nei, nā Liz MacPherson, Government Statistician


Key facts

Ngā whakaharahara

All information in this profile for the iwi grouping and total Māori descent populations is based on the Māori descent usually resident population count from the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings, held on 5 March 2013.

All information in this profile for the total New Zealand population is based on the census usually resident population count from the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings, held on 5 March 2013.

The Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping population includes all people of Māori descent who gave 'don’t know' for their iwi.

 

110,928 people or 16.6 percent of the total population of Māori descent, were in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping. For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 51.3 percent (56,868 people) were male and 48.7 percent (54,060 people) were female.
  • The median age (half are younger and half are older, than this age) was 21.5 years.
  • 4.7 percent could hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori.

 

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 49.2 percent stated that they had never been a regular smoker.
  • 67.4 percent held a formal qualification.
  • The median income (half received more, half received less, than this amount) was $25,700.
  • 71.1 percent living in the main urban areas (populations of 30,000 or more) were in the labour force.

 

Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages and medians may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Population and geography

Iwi Māori me ngā takotoranga papa

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

Population

  • 110,928 people, or 16.6 percent of the total population of Māori descent were in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping, an increase from 102,366 people in 2006. In 2001, there were 111,810 people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping.

Where iwi grouping members live

  • 66.3 percent lived in main urban areas (populations of 30,000 or more). In comparison, 65.6 percent of the total population of Māori descent lived in main urban areas.
  • 81.0 percent or 89,838 people were living in the North Island and 19.0 percent or 21,057 people were living in the South Island. Less than 1 percent or 33 people were living in the Chatham Islands.
  • The most common region(s) in which people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping lived was the Auckland Region (26.3 percent or 29,226 people). The second and third most common regions were the Waikato Region (13.7 percent or 15,174 people) and Canterbury Region (9.2 percent or 10,251 people).
  • 2,610 people stated they were living overseas five years ago.

 

Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Age and sex

Te pakeke me te ira tangata

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 37.4 percent were under the age of 15 years, compared with 33.1 percent of the total population of Māori descent. 37.4 percent in 2006 and 41.7 percent in 2001 were under the age of 15 years.
  • In 2013, 25.5 percent (28,233 people) were aged 15–29 years, an increase of 1668 people since 2006.
  • The proportion aged 30–64 years, 33.6 percent, has decreased since 2006 when it was 33.8 percent.
  • 3.6 percent (3,939 people) were aged 65 years and over, an increase of 1050 people since 2006.
  • The median age (half are younger and half are older than this age) was 21.5 years, compared with 24.4 years for the total population of Maōri descent and 38.0 years for the total New Zealand population. In 2006, the median age was 21.1 years.
  • 51.3 percent (56,868 people) were male and 48.7 percent (54,060 people) were female.

Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau population
By age group and sex
2013 Census
A specified iwi grouping population, by age group and sex, 2013 Census.


Māori descent population
By age group and sex
2013 Census
Māori descent population, by age group and sex, 2013 Census.


Total New Zealand population
By age group and sex
2013 Census
New Zealand population, by age group and sex, 2013 Census.


Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages and medians may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Language

Te reo

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 4.7 percent could hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori, in comparison with 18.4 percent of the total population of Māori descent.
  • In 2006, the figure was 5.0 percent (20.0 percent for the total population of Māori descent), and in 2001, 5.8 percent (21.1 percent for the total population of Māori descent).
  • 37.1 percent of those who could hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori were aged under 15 years. 58.0 percent were aged 15–64 years, and 5.0 percent were aged 65 years and over.
  • 52.9 percent who could hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori were male and 47.1 percent were female.

Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau who can hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori
By age group and sex
2013 Census
Specified iwi grouping, who can hold a conversation about everyday things in te reo Māori, by age group and sex, 2013 Census.


Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.

Religion

Te whakapono

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

Most common religion

  • The three most common religions were Catholic (8.4 percent), Anglican (6.4 percent), and Christian not further defined (5.3 percent).

No religion

  • 62.9 percent (67,764 people) stated they had no religion, while 6.7 percent (7,275 people) objected to answering the religion question.
  • 24.6 percent of people aged 65 years and over stated they had no religion, compared with 62.1 percent of those aged 15–64 years and 67.8 percent of those aged under 15 years.

Ratana and Ringatū

  • 1.5 percent were affiliated with the Ratana religion and less than 1 percent were affiliated with the Ringatū religion.

 

Note: 'Object to answering' is a response option for the religion question and so the calculation of percentages includes those responses.

Religious affiliation includes all people who stated each religious affiliation, whether as their only religious affiliation or as one of several. Where a person reported more than one religious affiliation, they were counted in each applicable group.

Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Cigarette smoking

Te momi tūpeka

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

Cigarette smoking behaviour

  • 49.2 percent stated that they had never been a regular smoker, compared with 44.4 percent in 2006.
  • 28.7 percent said they smoked cigarettes regularly. This was a decrease from 2006, when 36.6 percent said they smoked regularly.
  • 22.1 percent stated they were ex-smokers.

Age and sex of cigarette smokers

  • Women were more likely to be regular smokers (28.8 percent) than men (28.6 percent).
  • Smoking rates varied with age – 34.1 percent of those aged 25–34 years reported they were regular smokers, compared with 20.1 percent of those aged 55 years and over.

Cigarette smoking behaviour for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Cigarette smoking behaviour for specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Proportion of Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over who smoked cigarettes regularly
By age group
2006 and 2013 Censuses
Proportion of specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over who smoked cigarettes regularly, by age group, 2006 and 2013 Censuses.


Note: This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Number of children born

Te maha o ngā tamariki i whānau mai 

For women aged 15 years and over who stated how many children they had given birth to, in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping, and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 37.5 percent had never given birth, compared with 37.8 percent in 2006 . For the total female population of Māori descent, 32.5 percent had never given birth, compared with 32.4 percent in 2006.
  • 14.4 percent had given birth to one child, 36.4 percent had given birth to two or three children, and 11.7 percent had given birth to four or more children.
  • The average number of children born was 1.6. For the total female population of Māori descent, the average number of children born was 1.9.
  • 12.6 percent of those aged 45 years and over had never given birth.

For women aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 5.1 percent responded 'object to answering'. This compares with 5.9 percent in 2006.

 

Note: "Number of children born" counts all children born alive.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages and averages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Education

Te mātauranga

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 67.4 percent held a formal qualification, compared with 68.7 percent of the total population of Māori descent. In 2006, 63.0 percent held a formal qualification.
  • 8.2 percent (5,412 people) held a bachelor's degree or higher as their highest qualification, an increase from 6.6 percent (4,032 people) in 2006.
  • Women were more likely than men to have a formal qualification (69.6 percent compared with 65.3 percent).
  • 32.6 percent held no formal qualification. In 2006 this figure was 37.0 percent.
  • 56.5 percent of people aged 65 years and over had no formal qualification, compared with 28.0 percent of those aged 15–29 years, and 33.8 percent of those aged 30–64 years.

Highest qualification for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Highest qualification for specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Note: A 'formal qualification' includes qualifications achieved at secondary school and in tertiary education (both below degree level and bachelor's degree or higher).

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Income

Ngā whiwhinga moni

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

Median income

  • The median income (half received more and half received less than this amount) was $25,700. In comparison, the median income was $23,700 for the total population of Māori descent, and $28,500 for the total New Zealand population.
  • The median income has increased since 2006 when it was $23,800.
  • The median income was $32,300 for men and $20,700 for women.

Median income for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau, Māori descent, and total New Zealand populations aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Median income, for specified iwi, Māori descent, and total New Zealand populations aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Total personal income

  • 42.2 percent reported an annual personal income of $20,000 or less, while 9.0 percent received over $70,000.
  • At the time of the 2006 Census, 43.4 percent reported an annual personal income of $20,000 or less, while 5.4 percent received over $70,000.

Sources of personal income

  • 62.4 percent received wages or salaries. In 2006 this figure was 68.3 percent.
  • 9.1 percent received income from interest, rents, or other investments, and 11.3 percent received income from self-employment or from business.
  • 25.3 percent received income support as a source of income. In 2006 this figure was 22.2 percent.

 

Note: Total personal income information includes income from all sources and relates to the 12 months ending 31 March 2006 and 31 March 2013.

Sources of personal income information relates to the 12 months ending 7 March 2006 and 5 March 2013.

Sources of personal income includes all people who stated each source of personal income, whether as their only source or as one of several. Where a person reported more than one source of personal income, they have been counted in each applicable group.

Income support is a source of personal income. It includes the unemployment benefit, sickness benefit, domestic purposes benefit, invalid's benefit, student allowance, and other government benefits or payments.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages and medians may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Labour force

Te hunga mahi/kore mahi

Labour force

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 69,420 people were of working age (15 years and over). Of this group, 71.0 percent were in the labour force, compared with 68.4 percent of the total population of Māori descent, and 67.1 percent of the total New Zealand population.
  • 71.1 percent of people living in the main urban areas (populations of 30,000 or more) were in the labour force.
  • 75.9 percent of men and 65.9 percent of women were in the labour force. This compares with 80.7 percent of men and 68.4 percent of women in 2006.

Unemployment

For people in the labour force aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • The unemployment rate was 11.3 percent, an increase from 7.6 percent in 2006.
  • The unemployment rate for women (13.0 percent) was higher than the rate for men (9.9 percent).
  • People aged 15–24 years had an unemployment rate of 21.7 percent.

Unemployment rates for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By age group and sex
2013 Census
Unemployment rates for specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over, by age group and sex, 2013 Census.


Employment

For employed people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 78.4 percent worked full time (30 or more hours per week), with the rest working part time. In 2006, 79.2 percent were working full time.
  • Women were more likely to be employed part time than men, with 34.3 percent working part time, compared with 11.4 percent of men.
  • The most common occupational group(s) for men was technicians and trades workers while the most common occupational group(s) for women was clerical and administrative workers.
  • 84.9 percent of people employed were paid employees, 13.6 percent were employers or self-employed (without employees), and 1.6 percent were unpaid family workers.
  • Men were more likely to be employers or self-employed (without employees) than women, 16.2 percent compared with 10.3 percent.

Employment status for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau, Māori descent and New Zealand employed populations aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Employment status for specified iwi grouping, and Māori descent and New Zealand employed populations aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Occupation for employed Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Occupation for employed specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Note: Work and labour force information relates to the seven days ending 5 March 2006 and 3 March 2013.

The unemployment rate is the number of people aged 15 years and over who did not have a paid job, were available for work, and were actively seeking work, expressed as a percentage of the labour force. The official National unemployment rate is calculated from the Household Labour Force Survey.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Unpaid activities

Ngā ngohe utukore

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 30.4 percent of men and 43.6 percent of women had looked after a child who belonged to their household, while 13.1 percent of men and 24.5 percent of women had looked after a child who was not part of their household.
  • 8.8 percent had looked after a person who lived in their household and was ill or disabled, while 9.1 percent had helped a person in another household who was ill or disabled.
  • 11.8 percent carried out 'other helping or voluntary work for, or through any organisation, group or marae'. More women (13.3 percent) than men (10.4 percent) reported involvement in this type of voluntary work.

Unpaid activities for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By sex
2013 Census
Unpaid activities for specified iwi grouping, aged 15 years and over, by sex, 2013 Census.


Note: Unpaid activities information relates to the four weeks ending 5 March 2013.

Unpaid activities information includes all people who stated each unpaid activity, whether as their only unpaid activity or as one of several. Where a person reported more than one unpaid activity, they were counted in each applicable group. Therefore percentages do not add up to 100.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Households and families

Ngā momo nohoanga ā-whānau

Households

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in households in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 81.4 percent lived in households containing only one family, 8.5 percent lived in households with more than one family, and 5.5 percent lived in one-person households. A further 4.6 percent lived in 'non-family multi-person households', such as a flatting situation.

Families

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in families in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • In 2013, 54.4 percent of people living in a family situation lived in a couple with child(ren) family, 30.1 percent lived in a one-parent family, and 15.5 percent lived in a couple without children family.
  • In 2006, 55.4 percent of people living in a family situation lived in a couple with child(ren) family, 29.1 percent lived in a one-parent family, and 15.5 percent lived in a couple without children family.

Family type for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau, Māori descent, and total New Zealand populations
2013 Census
Family type for specified iwi grouping, Māori descent, and total New Zealand populations, 2013 Census.


Dependent children

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in families in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • In 2013, there were 45,396 dependent children (aged under 18 years and not employed full time). Of these 60.7 percent lived in a two-parent family, with the rest living in a family with one parent.
  • In 2006, there were 41,100 dependent children and of these, 61.5 percent lived in a two-parent family, with the rest living in a family with one parent.

 

Note: These sections combine personal characteristics with the characteristics of the household or family a person is a part of. They count people. People in the same household or family may or may not be of Māori descent, and those with Māori descent can affiliate with different iwi and be in different iwi groupings.

A household is either one person who usually lives alone, or two or more people who usually live together and share facilities (such as for eating, cooking, or a living area; and bathroom and toilet) in a private dwelling.

A family consists of a couple living in the same household, with or without children, or one parent and their children.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Housing

Ngā whare noho

Home ownership

For people aged 15 years and over in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in New Zealand on 5 March 2013: 

  • 32.0 percent of people owned or partly owned the home that they lived in. The proportion was less for men than for women, 30.9 percent compared with 33.1 percent.
  • 58.2 percent of people aged 50–59 years owned or partly owned their own home, compared with 9.4 percent of those aged 20–29 years.

Home ownership for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau aged 15 years and over
By age group
2013 Census
Home ownership for specified iwi grouping aged 15 years and over, by age group, 2013 Census.


Rental housing

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in households in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 48.1 percent were living in households in rental accommodation.
  • 83.9 percent of the people living in households in rental accommodation rented from a private person, trust, or business. A further 14.2 percent lived in Housing New Zealand Corporation accommodation.

Weekly rent paid

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in households in rental accommodation in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

  • 7.6 percent were living in households in rental accommodaton where the household paid less than $100 per week in rent, 15.9 percent paid $100–$199, 30.4 percent paid $200–$299, 29.0 percent paid $300–$399, and 17.2 percent paid $400 or more.

 

Note: The rental housing and weekly rent paid sections combine personal characteristics with the characteristics of the household a person is a part of. They count people. People in the same household may or may not be of Māori descent, and those with Māori descent can affiliate with different iwi and can be in different iwi groupings.

Living in households in rental accommodation consists of people in households who did not own their home or have it in a family trust and were paying rent.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


Motor vehicles, and phones, fax, and Internet

Ngā waka me ngā hangarau kōrero

For people in the Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau iwi grouping and living in households in New Zealand on 5 March 2013:

Motor vehicles

  • 92.4 percent were living in a household with access to a motor vehicle, compared with 90.9 percent of the total population of Māori descent.
  • At the time of the 2006 Census, 93.2 percent were living in a household with access to a motor vehicle.

Access to phones, fax, and Internet

  • 77.0 percent lived in a household with Internet access, an increase since the 2006 Census (59.2 percent).
  • 88.1 percent lived in a household with access to a cellphone or mobile phone.
  • 2.5 percent lived in a household with no access to telecommunication systems (cellphone/mobile phone, telephone, fax machine, or the Internet).

Access to phones, fax, and Internet for Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau
2006 and 2013 Censuses
Access to phones, fax and Internet for specified iwi grouping, 2006 and 2013 Censuses.


Note: These sections combine personal characteristics with the characteristics of the household a person is a part of. They count people. People in the same household may or may not be of Māori descent, and those with Māori descent can affiliate with different iwi and can be in different iwi groupings.

A household is either one person who usually lives alone, or two or more people who usually live together and share facilities (such as for eating, cooking, or a living area; and bathroom and toilet) in a private dwelling.

Households can access more than one type of telecommunication system. Where a household reported access to more than one telecommunication system they have been counted in each category. Therefore percentages do not add up to 100.

This data has been randomly rounded to protect confidentiality. Individual figures may not add up to totals, and values for the same data may vary in different text, tables, and graphs. The accuracy of percentages may be affected by this rounding, particularly for iwi groupings with small populations.


About the data

All information in this profile for the iwi grouping and total Māori descent populations is based on the Māori descent usually resident population count from the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings, held on 5 March 2013.

All information in this profile for the total New Zealand population is based on the census usually resident population count from the 2013 Census of Population and Dwellings, held on 5 March 2013.

The total population of Māori descent includes all people who stated they were descended from a person of the Māori race of New Zealand. This population includes all people of Māori descent, whether or not they specified an iwi.

Iwi groupings are larger groupings of individual iwi. There are 13 iwi groupings, including a grouping for people who did not know their iwi (Ngā Hotahota o te Whitau).

People can affiliate with more than one iwi. Where a person has reported an affiliation with more than one iwi and those iwi are within the same iwi grouping, the person was counted once in that grouping. Where a person has reported an affiliation with more than one iwi and those iwi are in different iwi groupings, a person was counted once within each grouping.

Calculation of percentages

Unless otherwise stated, all percentages and ratios in this profile exclude responses that cannot be classified (eg 'not stated', 'response unidentifiable', 'response out of scope').

Comparability with past census data

Because the 2011 Census was cancelled after the Canterbury earthquake on 22 February 2011, the gap between this census and the last one is seven years. The change in data between 2006 and 2013 may be greater than in the usual five-year gap between censuses. Be careful when comparing trends.

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